• Human-Translated Fact Sheets and Video
  • Large Print

Housing & Shelter

    Results: 18

  • Children's/Adolescent Residential Treatment Facilities (1)
    RM-7000.1500

    Children's/Adolescent Residential Treatment Facilities

    RM-7000.1500

    Programs that provide a therapeutic living environment in a community-based facility for emotionally disturbed, severely learning disabled, delinquent, pre-delinquent and/or abused children and youth who, because of the severity of their problems, are unable to adjust to other placements but do not require inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Services include crisis stabilization, initial and continuing bio-psychosocial assessment, care management, medication management, therapy and mobilization of family support and community resources in the context of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan. Residents often attend on-grounds schools or public special education classes and receive services that are geared to their individual needs and the goal of returning to their own or their foster families.
  • Crisis Shelter (10)
    BH-1800.1500

    Crisis Shelter

    BH-1800.1500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay for people who are unable to return to their own homes due to sexual assault, domestic violence, human trafficking or other problems. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are in one of these situations.
  • Domestic Violence Shelters (3)
    BH-1800.1500-100

    Domestic Violence Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-100

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for women who have experienced domestic violence/abuse, and for their children. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of secondary services related to domestic violence including referral to appropriate resources. Also included are similar facilities for battered men and those that can accommodate both men and women.
  • Emergency Shelter (9)
    BH-1800

    Emergency Shelter

    BH-1800

    Programs that provide a temporary or transitional place to stay for newcomers, people who are in crisis, or homeless individuals in the community.
  • Homeless Drop In Centers (2)
    BH-1800.3500

    Homeless Drop In Centers

    BH-1800.3500

    Centers where homeless people can spend time during the day or evening. Services may include counseling and/or medication monitoring on a formal or informal basis; personal hygiene supplies; facilities for showering, shaving, napping, laundering clothes, making necessary telephone calls or attending to other personal needs; and other basic supportive services. Some centers may also provide meals or facilities for cooking. Programs that focus on homeless youth may provide case management, living skills training, family reunification assistance, classes and other educational supports, pre-employment training, health education (including HIV prevention), help in obtaining valid ID and other services that help youth successfully exit street life and transition to independent living.
  • Homeless Shelter (12)
    BH-1800.8500

    Homeless Shelter

    BH-1800.8500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay (usually three days to two weeks), generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy, for people who have no permanent housing. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are homeless.
  • Housing Counseling (2)
    BH-3700

    Housing Counseling

    BH-3700

    Programs that provide comprehensive assistance for people who want to rent or purchase housing including information and guidance about buying and rental costs; how to select affordable housing that meets individual needs; and how to provide for insurance, maintenance and other requirements related to acquiring and paying for housing.
  • Limited Equity Housing Cooperatives (1)
    BH-7000.8100-300

    Limited Equity Housing Cooperatives

    BH-7000.8100-300

    Apartment or condominium complexes or other housing facilities that are owned and administered collectively by the people who live there. A nonprofit corporation is set up to own and manage a building and the land on which it is located. Cooperative members do not own a particular part of the building and/or land, but own a share of stock in the project and the right to occupy a unit there. New residents are screened and selected by current residents and all pay equal shares of the cost of housing. Some housing cooperatives set aside a certain number of units for low-income people. Lower turnover rates, lower real estate tax assessments (in some local areas), controlled maintenance costs, and resident participation and control are some of the benefits of choosing cooperative homeownership. There are also personal income tax advantages.
  • Mass Care Shelters (1)
    TH-2600.1580-500

    Mass Care Shelters

    TH-2600.1580-500

    Programs that provide temporary shelter with sleeping accommodations for people whose homes have been made temporarily unsafe or uninhabitable by a major disaster or large-scale emergency that has disrupted the normal functioning of their community and who are unable to find alternative living arrangements. Also included are programs that provide overnight accommodations during extreme cold for people who are at risk of exposure due to a power failure, fuel shortage or other local emergency. Mass shelter care programs may open facilities such as schools, recreation centers and armories prior to or following a disaster or local emergency, or provide amenities such as tents for people who are sleeping in parks and other open spaces.
  • Mental Health Halfway Houses (1)
    RR-8800.5100

    Mental Health Halfway Houses

    RR-8800.5100

    Programs that provide congregate living arrangements and a wide variety of counseling and supportive services to facilitate the return to the community, if possible, of people who have received psychiatric treatment in an inpatient or residential treatment facility for acute or chronic mental or emotional disorders. Included are facilities that provide brief, intermediate and lifelong living arrangements in a sheltered environment.
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (1)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Semi-Independent Living Residences for Adults With Disabilities (1)
    BH-8400.6000-800

    Semi-Independent Living Residences for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-800

    Programs that provide housing in a group setting for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional disabilities or multiple disabilities in facilities like small homes, apartment buildings, condominiums or agency-owned complexes which may be staffed to provide functional skills training and on-site supportive services. Residents generally have basic self-help skills or take responsibility for employing and supervising aides to assist them in meeting their personal needs. Staff may be available on a 24-hour basis or only occasionally depending on the specific needs of residents. Included are short-term transitional programs for people who are preparing for supported or totally independent living as well as long-term programs for people who may want to be permanent residents.
  • Sexual Assault Shelters (1)
    BH-1800.1500-800

    Sexual Assault Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-800

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for women who have been victimized by rape and/or other forms of sexual assault. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and significant other counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to sexual assault including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Single Room Occupancy Housing (1)
    BH-7000.4600-800

    Single Room Occupancy Housing

    BH-7000.4600-800

    Single room occupancy housing, which may include shared bath or kitchen facilities, that is owned and maintained by nonprofit and/or public organizations and is made available to eligible individuals at low rates. Also included are hotels that have been converted for use as single room occupancy housing.
  • Street Outreach Programs (5)
    PH-8000

    Street Outreach Programs

    PH-8000

    Programs that are staffed by outreach workers who spend time with people who live on the street, build relationships with them, identify and address their immediate needs (e.g., crisis intervention, food, clean clothing, hygiene kits, blankets, someone to listen) and provide information about and linkage to longer-term forms of support such as shelter, counseling, drug and alcohol detoxification and rehabilitation, care/case management and, where applicable, family reunification services. Street outreach programs may be staffed by volunteers or peers who were formerly homeless; and may target special populations such as homeless youth at risk for sexual abuse or exploitation, veterans, or people with specific medical or mental health conditions, or be available to the larger homeless population.
  • Therapeutic Group Homes (1)
    PH-6300.8600

    Therapeutic Group Homes

    PH-6300.8600

    Programs that provide an alternative living environment and mental health treatment services in licensed, non-secure facilities for children and adolescents with significant emotional or behavioral problems who have some capability to engage in community-based activities. Although the types and combinations of treatment vary, treatment services typically include individual, group and family counseling, behavior modification, vocational training, recreational therapy and skill building. Therapeutic group homes are generally licensed by the state; offer a less restrictive treatment environment than residential treatment, but are more restrictive than therapeutic foster care; and are located in the community where residents attend local schools.
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (15)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.
  • Veteran Home Loans (2)
    BH-3500.3400-900

    Veteran Home Loans

    BH-3500.3400-900

    Programs that assist veterans who want to purchase or construct a home by issuing GI loans which feature moderate interest rates, no down payment, a long repayment period, and the right to pay all or a portion or the loan in advance without penalty.
 
Processing...


Driving Walking/Biking Public Transit  Get Directions