Children, Parents & Families

    Results: 52

  • Abuse Counseling (1)
    RP-1400.8000-020

    Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020

    Programs that provide individual, conjoint, family or group treatment for people who are experiencing physical, sexual, emotional and/or other forms of abuse in the context a marital, parental, sibling or other family relationship or, in some instances, outside the family. Included are programs that provide therapeutic interventions for perpetrators and/or for individuals who have been victimized.
  • Adolescent/Youth Counseling (19)
    RP-1400.8000-050

    Adolescent/Youth Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-050

    Programs that specialize in the treatment of adolescents, usually age 12 or 13 through 17, who have adjustment problems, behavior problems, emotional disturbance, a personality disorder or incipient mental illness. The programs may help youth troubled by low self-esteem, social isolation, peer pressure, bullying, school performance issues, truancy, anger management issues, family problems, grief and loss, sexual promiscuity, sexually transmitted disease, alcohol or drug addiction, eating disorders, oppositional and defiant behaviors, depression and anxiety, suicidal thoughts or other difficult issues.
  • Adoption Evaluation/Placement (1)
    PH-0300.0350

    Adoption Evaluation/Placement

    PH-0300.0350

    Programs that assess the needs and capabilities of children who have been relinquished for adoption, compile the children's social and medical histories, make arrangements for care and supervision of the children prior to placement, evaluate prospective adoptive applicants including a review of adoptive home studies, if available, and select and approve prospective adoptive homes.
  • Adult/Child Mentoring Programs (1)
    PH-1400.5000-100

    Adult/Child Mentoring Programs

    PH-1400.5000-100

    Programs like Big Brothers or Big Sisters which provide male or female adult companionship, guidance and/or role models for young men or women who are from families in which adult figures of the same sex are absent or available on a limited and inadequate basis or who are troubled and at risk for delinquency. Also included are programs in which people in their teens provide companionship for younger children.
  • Boys/Girls Clubs (1)
    PS-9800.1000

    Boys/Girls Clubs

    PS-9800.1000

    Programs that provide a wide range of supervised recreational activities and delinquency prevention services for children and youth of all ages and backgrounds, but particularly for disadvantaged youth, through membership in boys and/or girls clubs. Club members are entitled to use recreational facilities and may have access to counseling, tutorial services, employment assistance, gang programs, drug abuse and alcoholism prevention and other activities and services that direct their energies toward positive social goals and facilitate healthy personality development.
  • Breastfeeding Support Programs (1)
    LJ-5000.1000

    Breastfeeding Support Programs

    LJ-5000.1000

    Programs that provide information and instruction concerning appropriate techniques for nursing an infant for expectant parents or new mothers.
  • Child Abuse Counseling (3)
    RP-1400.8000-020.15

    Child Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020.15

    Programs that provide therapeutic interventions for individuals and/or families who are experiencing child abuse including abandonment, neglect, or emotional, physical or sexual abuse by a parent, guardian, or other family or extended family member whom the child trusts and who is in a position of power over the child. Counseling is offered in a variety of settings and may include individual, conjoint, family and group therapy sessions for the child, the abusing or non-abusing parent(s) and siblings. Separate sessions may be available for young children who have been victimized and for older children in their teens.
  • Child Abuse Hotlines (1)
    RP-1500.1400-150

    Child Abuse Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-150

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for parents who have abused or fear they may abuse their children with the objective of defusing the parent's anger and frustration and ensuring the child's future safety through referrals for ongoing support and treatment. Also included may be services for abused children and concerned others who are in need of advice, guidance and/or emotional support. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Child Abuse Prevention (1)
    FN-1500.1900-150

    Child Abuse Prevention

    FN-1500.1900-150

    Programs, often offered in the schools or in other community settings, that attempt to protect children from physical, sexual and/or emotional abuse or exploitation through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with children and/or the community at large. The sessions may offer suggestions for children and/or parents regarding ways of avoiding or handling an abusive or potentially abusive situation and/or information about the indicators and incidence of abuse, requirements for reporting abuse and community resources that are available to children who have been abused and to their families.
  • Child Care Provider Associations (1)
    TN-1400

    Child Care Provider Associations

    TN-1400

    Organizations whose members are child care providers who have affiliated for the purpose of advancing the profession; promoting mutual interests; attending child care conferences; exchanging ideas with other practitioners in their field; obtaining access to technical assistance, information about best practices and other resources; and taking advantage of other opportunities for continuing professional development.
  • Child Care Provider Referrals (1)
    PH-2400.1500

    Child Care Provider Referrals

    PH-2400.1500

    Programs that provide statewide and community-based services that are designed to improve the availability and quality of child care. These programs maintain lists of child care resources and link families who are in need of child care services with child care centers, licensed family child care homes and other organization-based providers; provide information that helps families become good consumers of child care services; recruit new child care providers to expand the availability of the service locally; provide training and technical assistance for providers; and collect and disseminate data which document the demand for child care services and the current availability of child care resources. Some programs may also make referrals to preschools and many provide referrals to children's play groups.
  • Child Care Provider Training (2)
    JR-8200.1500-150

    Child Care Provider Training

    JR-8200.1500-150

    Programs that provide pre-service or in-service training for individuals entering or currently involved in the delivery of child care services in any of a variety of child care settings. The training may focus on the elements of a safe and healthy environment, childhood development, behavior management, inclusion of children with special needs and developmentally appropriate practices.
  • Child Guidance (4)
    RP-1400.8000-155

    Child Guidance

    RP-1400.8000-155

    Programs that specialize in the treatment of children from infancy to age 12 who have adjustment problems, behavior problems, emotional disturbances, a personality disorder or incipient mental illness.
  • Child Sexual Abuse Counseling (2)
    RP-1400.8000-020.18

    Child Sexual Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020.18

    Programs that specialize in the treatment of children and youth who are coping with the trauma of child sexual abuse which occurs when an adult, older adolescent or another child threatens, forces or manipulates a child into sexual activity abusing the relationship of power and authority that adults have over children. Sexual abuse includes sexual kissing, touching, fondling a child’s genitals, oral, anal or vaginal intercourse and incest (sexual intercourse between an adult family member and a child or between siblings) as well as behaviors that don’t involve contact such as genital exposure ("flashing"), intentionally engaging in sexual activity in front of a child, verbal pressure for sex, and sexual exploitation for purposes of prostitution or pornography. Child sexual abuse can take place within the family by a parent, step-parent, sibling or other relative; or outside the home by a friend, neighbor, child care provider, teacher or stranger. Separate counseling sessions may be structured for young children who have been victimized and for older children in their teens.
  • Children's Psychiatric Inpatient Units (1)
    RM-3300.6600-150

    Children's Psychiatric Inpatient Units

    RM-3300.6600-150

    Programs offered in special units of general acute care hospitals that provide diagnostic and treatment services for children from infancy through age 12 who have acute psychiatric disorders, require hospitalization for maximum benefit, and who may be a threat to themselves, to their families or to others if left in the community or placed in a less restrictive treatment setting. Services may include a comprehensive evaluation; 24-hour care in a supportive, therapeutic environment; counseling for the patient and family; adjunctive therapies as needed; medication, if required; and an aftercare program following discharge.
  • Children's/Adolescent Psychiatric Hospitals (1)
    RM-3300.6500-150

    Children's/Adolescent Psychiatric Hospitals

    RM-3300.6500-150

    Institutions whose primary function is to provide diagnostic and long or short-term treatment services for children and adolescents from infancy through age 17 who have acute psychiatric disorders, require hospitalization for maximum benefit, and who may be a threat to themselves, to their families or to others if left in the community or placed in a less restrictive treatment setting. Services may include a comprehensive evaluation; 24-hour care in a supportive, therapeutic environment; counseling for the patient and family; adjunctive therapies, as needed; medication, if required; and an aftercare program following discharge.
  • Children's/Adolescent Residential Treatment Facilities (1)
    RM-7000.1500

    Children's/Adolescent Residential Treatment Facilities

    RM-7000.1500

    Programs that provide a therapeutic living environment in a community-based facility for emotionally disturbed, severely learning disabled, delinquent, pre-delinquent and/or abused children and youth who, because of the severity of their problems, are unable to adjust to other placements but do not require inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Services include crisis stabilization, initial and continuing bio-psychosocial assessment, care management, medication management, therapy and mobilization of family support and community resources in the context of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan. Residents often attend on-grounds schools or public special education classes and receive services that are geared to their individual needs and the goal of returning to their own or their foster families.
  • Educational Support Services (1)
    HL

    Educational Support Services

    HL

    Programs within the formal education system at elementary, secondary or postsecondary levels, or offered by outside agencies, that provide non-instructional services which support the admission of students to an educational program, their health and living conditions while students, their extracurricular activities options, and their ability to choose an appropriate course of study and adjust to and remain in school through the completion of their high school diplomas or college/university degrees.
  • Expectant/New Parent Assistance (1)
    PH-6100.1800

    Expectant/New Parent Assistance

    PH-6100.1800

    Programs that provide educational and supportive services for new parents or parents who are expecting a child to prepare them on an emotional and practical level for the impact that a newborn will have upon their lives and relationships. Included are practical information about the care of a new infant such as bathing techniques, diapering, feeding cycles and infant and childhood illnesses and later, walking, talking, toilet training and other developmental skills; suggestions for sibling preparation; and other techniques for facilitating the addition of the newborn to the family and supporting his or her development as a toddler and young child.
  • Family Counseling (21)
    RF-2000

    Family Counseling

    RF-2000

    Programs that offer therapeutic sessions that focus on the system of relationships and communication patterns among family members and which attempt to modify those relationships and patterns to achieve greater harmony. The therapist focuses on the family as a unit rather than concentrating on one of the members who is singled out as the person in need of treatment.
  • Family Counseling Agencies (5)
    RM-6500.2000

    Family Counseling Agencies

    RM-6500.2000

    Outpatient facilities that offer a variety of counseling services for individuals, couples, families and extended family groups who may be experiencing difficulty resolving personal or interpersonal conflicts or making personal adjustments to stressful life situations such as separation, divorce, widowhood, loss of a child, poor health, unemployment, family violence, delinquency or substance abuse.
  • Family Maintenance/Reunification (1)
    PH-6500.1500-200

    Family Maintenance/Reunification

    PH-6500.1500-200

    Programs that work with families who have an open child abuse case following emergency response or with families who have been identified as being at risk for child abuse or neglect with the objective of establishing a case plan for ongoing services which will allow the child to remain in the home or return to the home if previously removed. Services provided or coordinated for the family may include individual, group, family or conjoint counseling for the abusing and nonabusing parent(s), siblings, and/or the abused child; home management training; parenting skills training; shelter care; and/or respite care.
  • Family Preservation Programs (2)
    PH-2360.2350

    Family Preservation Programs

    PH-2360.2350

    Programs that provide a variety of short-term, intensive, home-based intervention services for families experiencing a crisis that is so severe that children are at imminent risk for placement outside the family setting. Services, which are aimed at ameliorating the underlying causes of family dysfunction, are generally time-limited, of fairly short duration and available on a 24-hour basis. Also included are other family preservation program models whose programs vary in terms of the population served, the level of intensity of services provided and the length of services. The objective of family preservation programs is to preserve the family as a unit and prevent unnecessary placement of the children in foster care, a group home, an inpatient substance abuse or mental health treatment program, a residential training school or other alternative living arrangement.
  • Family Violence Prevention (3)
    FN-1500.1900

    Family Violence Prevention

    FN-1500.1900

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of child abuse, elder abuse and spouse abuse in family settings through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with families and/or the community at large.
  • Formula/Baby Food (1)
    BD-1800.8200-250

    Formula/Baby Food

    BD-1800.8200-250

    Programs that supply infant formula and/or baby food, usually in addition to other groceries.
  • Foster Home Placement (3)
    PH-2400.1900

    Foster Home Placement

    PH-2400.1900

    Programs that link individuals who are in need of alternative living arrangements with appropriate private family homes that are licensed to provide foster care. Licensing requirements vary from state to state and, in some situations, licensing is not required at all. Programs that provide placement services for children and adults with disabilities are generally also responsible for recruiting, training, certifying and monitoring placements in family homes and for providing support for the family and the individual(s) with disabilities who live with them.
  • Gang Programs (2)
    FN-2300

    Gang Programs

    FN-2300

    Programs offered by community and law enforcement agencies that attempt to reduce the incidence of gang violence by providing counseling, recreational activities and other preventive alternatives; and/or by establishing direct contact with gang members, mediating intergang disputes, facilitating intergang communication and mobilizing the community to support gangs in finding nonviolent ways to reconcile their differences.
  • Juvenile Delinquency Diversion Counseling (3)
    RP-1400.8000-370

    Juvenile Delinquency Diversion Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-370

    Programs that provide individual, conjoint, family and group counseling for people younger than age 18 who are at risk for or have committed delinquent acts and who are directed to participate in counseling for a period of time as an alternative to arrest, a hearing in a juvenile delinquency or youth court, or, in some cases, another court-ordered disposition. These programs are often provided by agencies which also offer other types of counseling for young people and their families, which coordinate with the referring agency concerning the client's responsible use of services and which involve the client's family in the counseling process as needed.
  • Juvenile Delinquency Prevention (1)
    FN-1500.3600

    Juvenile Delinquency Prevention

    FN-1500.3600

    Programs that offer a variety of activities for youth who are at risk for behavior which is likely to involve them in the juvenile justice system with the objective of assisting them to improve self-esteem, to become aware of alternative ways of dealing with feelings and leisure time, and to take responsibility for the consequences of their actions. Included may be counseling, rap and discussion groups, tutoring, companionship programs, alternative peer group experiences and supervised recreational activities.
  • Juvenile Probation (1)
    FF-0500.6550-350

    Juvenile Probation

    FF-0500.6550-350

    Programs that provide formal supervision and support for young men and women who have been convicted of an offense and released into the community under the supervision of a probation officer, usually in lieu of incarceration. The individual must agree to standards of conduct specified by the court for a set amount of time, usually for one year. Violations of the agreement subject the individual to revocation of his or her liberty.
  • Maternity Homes (1)
    LJ-5000.5000

    Maternity Homes

    LJ-5000.5000

    Programs that provide shelter, care and support services, which often include counseling regarding future plans and instruction in child care and development, for pregnant women who are unable to remain in their own homes.
  • Mentoring Programs (2)
    PH-1400.5000

    Mentoring Programs

    PH-1400.5000

    Programs that provide companionship, guidance and/or role models for individuals who are disadvantaged because of age, income, physical or developmental disabilities or family environment.
  • Military Family Service/Support Centers (1)
    TM-5100

    Military Family Service/Support Centers

    TM-5100

    Programs located at military installations throughout the world that handle inquiries from military personnel, retirees, reservists and their family members, do an assessment of their needs and refer them to sources of help available at the installation or in the local community. The centers may provide relocation assistance, transition assistance, family life programs (e.g., parenting, stress management), individual and family counseling, employment assistance, and financial management services as well as emergency assistance.
  • Parent Counseling (1)
    RP-1400.8000-650

    Parent Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-650

    Programs that provide a wide variety of therapeutic interventions for parents who are experiencing emotional difficulties or conflicts concerning their role as parents. Included are individual or group counseling for one or both parents or conjoint parent counseling which focuses on and explores the mental, emotional or social problems of the individual(s) which contribute to their parenting problems.
  • Parental Visitation Monitoring (1)
    PH-6000.6500

    Parental Visitation Monitoring

    PH-6000.6500

    Programs that provide supervised visitation for people ordered by the court to visit their minor children only in the presence of a neutral, responsible person. Also included are programs that link parents with people who are trained to act as monitors.
  • Parenting Education (7)
    PH-6100

    Parenting Education

    PH-6100

    Programs that provide classes, workshops or other educational opportunities for parents or potential parents who want to acquire the knowledge and skills to be effective in their parenting role.
  • Perinatal Substance Use Disorder Treatment (2)
    RX-8450.6600

    Perinatal Substance Use Disorder Treatment

    RX-8450.6600

    Programs that provide comprehensive treatment services on a residential, outpatient or day treatment basis for pregnant women who have a substance use disorder, women who are parenting children, generally age three or younger, and/or women who have babies who were exposed to drugs and/or alcohol during pregnancy. Services may include individual and group counseling, 12-step meetings, social and recreational activities, educational and vocational services, life skills training, primary health care, perinatal health care, HIV testing and counseling, AIDS prevention, a program for family members, relapse prevention services, a continuing care program and a wide array of supportive services such as child care, transportation and parenting skills development. The objective of the program is to help these women restructure their lives so that they can handle their parenting responsibilities as well as remain alcohol and/or drug free.
  • Postadoption Counseling and Support (2)
    PH-0300.0300-650

    Postadoption Counseling and Support

    PH-0300.0300-650

    Programs that provide guidance and support following placement of a child to help the adopting family through the early period of adjustment or thereafter as needed.
  • Preadoptive Foster Care (1)
    PH-0300.6500

    Preadoptive Foster Care

    PH-0300.6500

    Programs that provide temporary family living arrangements in agency-supervised private family homes for children who have been relinquished for adoption but have not yet been permanently placed. Some programs may also provide care for infants while birth parents decide whether to parent or place their child for adoption.
  • Pregnancy Counseling (3)
    LJ-2000.6500

    Pregnancy Counseling

    LJ-2000.6500

    Programs that help people who are experiencing a crisis pregnancy resolve any social or personal problems that have arisen as a result of their pregnancy or the prospect of parenthood, and help them understand their conflicting emotions, put their feelings in perspective, evaluate their options and make a decision that right is for them.
  • Pregnancy Testing (1)
    LJ-2000.6750

    Pregnancy Testing

    LJ-2000.6750

    Programs that utilize laboratory procedures to determine whether an individual is pregnant or which provide access to devices for establishing pregnancy that people can use at home.
  • Preschools (1)
    HD-1800.6500

    Preschools

    HD-1800.6500

    Programs that provide educational experiences and activities for children who are younger than compulsory school age, supplement parental care and home play and stimulate intellectual, social, emotional and motor skills development. Activities generally include preacademic skill development such as shape, color and number recognition; active outdoor play; observation of nature and pets; dancing and rhythms; block building; playhouse activities; games; simple excursions outside the school; stories and picture books. Children are also given a nutritious snack and/or meal and a period for adequate rest, and are taught basic cleanliness and good health habits.
  • Runaway/Homeless Youth Counseling (2)
    RP-1400.8000-750

    Runaway/Homeless Youth Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-750

    Programs that provide emotional support, information and guidance for children and adolescents who have run away from home and for the entire family, if appropriate, with the objective of identifying and resolving the problems that prompted the youth to leave home and/or assisting the youth to formulate and implement a workable plan for his or her immediate future.
  • Runaway/Homeless Youth Helplines (3)
    RP-1500.1400-700

    Runaway/Homeless Youth Helplines

    RP-1500.1400-700

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk of abuse. Included may be steps to ensure the youth's safety, information regarding the youth's rights and alternatives, and referrals for shelter, medical care, ongoing counseling or group support and other related services. Also included are programs that maintain a message relay system which allows runaways to contact their parents or other concerned individuals and receive messages from them. Helpline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (1)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • School Health Programs (1)
    HL-7500

    School Health Programs

    HL-7500

    Programs, usually within the formal education system , that provide basic health services for school age youth. Services usually include general physical examinations, treatment for minor illnesses and injuries, administration of prescription medication and health screening. Services for students with special health needs may include special feedings, clean intermittent catherization, suctioning, administering medication, and planning for the safety of a student in school. Some programs may provide sexuality education and related services including personal relationship counseling, pregnancy testing, screening and treatment for sexually transmitted diseases and birth control counseling. Included are health clinics on college/university campuses as well as health offices in elementary and secondary level schools.
  • Sexually Abused Children (2)
    YX-0500.8000

    Sexually Abused Children

    YX-0500.8000

    Individuals younger than age 18 who have been sexually assaulted by a family member, acquaintance or stranger or who have been subjected to sexual exploitation in the form of child prostitution or child pornography.
  • Special Library Collections (2)
    TJ-4500.8300

    Special Library Collections

    TJ-4500.8300

    Regular libraries or other organizations that acquire, house and make available to the community for purposes of research or appreciation, aggregations of printed works or manuscripts on a particular subject or by a particular author; artistic materials by a particular artist or representative of a particular era or style; or other collectibles that are rare, of special interest, of historical significance or of scholarly value. Also included are organizations that acquire, classify and make available to the community on a loan or distribution basis, special document collections or reading materials in a variety of language or special formats which enable people who have visual or hearing impairments or who read in a language other than English to enjoy leisure reading materials and selected nonfiction and reference works.
  • Student Counseling Services (1)
    HL-8120.7950

    Student Counseling Services

    HL-8120.7950

    Programs, usually within the formal education system at elementary, secondary and post-secondary levels, that provide information and guidance on an individual or group basis for students, including students with disabilities, who are experiencing personal, interpersonal or family problems such as substance abuse, loss of a family member or friend, divorce of a parent, personal and sexual relationships issues, dealing with bullies; or problems that arise as a part of school or university life such as test-taking anxiety, fear of oral examinations or participating in classroom discussions, tension or inexpressiveness in difficult interviews or procrastination in studying.
  • Teen Pregnancy Prevention (4)
    LJ-8000.8500

    Teen Pregnancy Prevention

    LJ-8000.8500

    Programs that provide a variety of informational and supportive services which promote healthy teen attitudes and behaviors regarding sexuality with the objective of heightening their awareness of the consequences of sexual activity and helping teens to avoid an unwanted pregnancy. Topics may include peer pressure, parent/teen communications, male/female relationships, values clarification, self-esteem, human reproduction, birth control and sexually transmitted diseases including AIDS. The goal of many of these programs is to help young people develop the knowledge, autonomy and skills they will need to make the transition to adulthood in good sexual health.
  • Therapeutic Foster Homes (1)
    PH-6300.8500

    Therapeutic Foster Homes

    PH-6300.8500

    Agency-supervised private family homes in which foster parents have been trained to provide individualized, structured services in a safe, nurturing family living environment for children and adolescents with significant emotional or behavioral problems who require a higher level of care than is found in a conventional foster home but do not require placement in a more restrictive setting. Therapeutic foster parents receive special training in mental health issues, behavior management and parenting techniques; and implement the in-home portion of the treatment plan with close supervision and support. They serve as integral members of the team of professionals providing services for the child, get the child to therapy and other treatment appointments, write daily notes about interventions and attend treatment team meetings. Therapeutic foster care is considered the least restrictive out-of-home placement for children with severe emotional disorders.
  • Youth Issues Lines (1)
    TJ-3200.9500

    Youth Issues Lines

    TJ-3200.9500

    Programs that provide telephone information about specific youth-related topics such as alcohol and drug abuse; child abuse; sexuality; sexually transmitted diseases; AIDS; birth control, pregnancy and choices; sexual assault; weight management; relationships; dealing with feelings; family concerns; dealing with rules; and school, career and life choices. Included are programs with tapes on specific topics that youth can select and access through a central number which are then played over the telephone, those that are staffed by live operators who can answer questions directly, and those that provide youth issues information via an Internet website.
 
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